Category Archives: interview

Comedy is One Giant Step for Mankind (and Mick Foley) (via Indy Star)

For All Mankind (AP)

For All Mankind (AP)

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Indy Star — In our 20-minute interview, wrestling legend-turned-comic Mick Foley spot-named the starting lineup of IU’s 1976 championship team, recalled discussing “the gentler sides of his personality” with the lead singer of Twisted Sister, confirmed that he wrote his New York Times best-selling memoir (yeah) longhand and said he literally cannot be around quiche.

If you’re not familiar with Foley, who appears March 13 at Crackers in what he says will be his last comedy/storytelling appearance “for the foreseeable future,” there are many ways to introduce yourself to his work. But you should probably start with his 1998 “Hell in the Cell” match vs. the Undertaker, a legendarily brutal bout in which he (as Mankind) gets thrown off a 16-foot-high steel cage through a ringside table, is wheeled out on a stretcher, lumbers off the stretcher, returns to the cage, climbs to the top again, gets choke-slammed through the cage onto the mat and is briefly shown with a tooth poking out of his nostril. There’s also a body slam onto a pile of thumbtacks.

More Foley at the Indy Star.

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Kenny Chesney: How the Fittest Man in Country Stays That Way (via GQ)

(Photo / Allister Ann)

(Photo / Allister Ann)

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GQ — Kenny Chesney’s songs may be about whiling away his days in sun-baked margaritavilles, but his own summers are frenetic. That’s because, in 2016, the list of male pop stars who can routinely sell out stadiums pretty much begins and ends with him. Last summer he played to 55,000 at the Rose Bowl (in its first-ever country show), 58,000 at MetLife Stadium and 54,000 at Mile High Stadium; he sold out his 12th and 13th nights at Gillette Stadium and broke his own records at Heinz Field, Lambeau, Lincoln Financial Field in Philly, and Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City. And these aren’t ballad-heavy evenings; they’re two-plus hours of relentlessly carbonated pop-country, punctuated by sprinting and jumping and hat-flipping.

Chesney may sing about boats, beaches and Barbados, but his health ethic is dead serious—especially for a guy who grew up in Tennessee, a place not particularly noted for its judicious approach to portion sizes. Today, at 47, it’s still paying dividends.

Check it out here.

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Perry Farrell’s 9-Step Guide to Becoming a Sinewy Tiger (via GQ)

Perry-Farrel-Fitness

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GQ — Look at this man. Perry Farrell is, pretty obviously, a jungle cat. He’s a prime physical specimen, a rock star in the cosmic sense, a man of wildly diverse active interests and a guy who is very, very difficult to interview about staying in shape. Because though Farrell, at 56, is cut like a beast and in peak condition, he is not a guy who shares his workout philosophy in what you might call “a linear fashion.”

But here’s the weird thing: His advice, when it comes, is a wild mix of new-age mysticism and the most consistently conservative approach to fitness you’ve ever heard. One minute it’s, “Musicians were revered because we provided almost a psychiatry in the way people can hear a song and be healed by it,” and the next it’s “If you feel like you’re eating too much, stay away for a while until you trim down.”

So rather than try to fashion his thoughts into some synthetic order, we present Perry Farrell’s Obviously Effective Yet Highly Non-Linear Rules of Fitness. (Only one of them involves throat-cutting!)

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Ask Me Anything: Jamie Hyneman, Outgoing MythBuster (via Indianapolis Monthly)

JamieHyneman-357x500

Jamie Hyneman, MythBuster and Indiana guy

Indianapolis Monthly — After a 14-year run for Discovery Channel’s MythBusters, January marks the beginning of the final season for the series that brought viewers duct-tape boats, rocket-powered Chevy Impalas, and all manner of explosions. While fans might be disappointed, the show’s serious special-effects impresario—a Columbus native and Indiana University grad—is looking forward to the peace and quiet.

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You just wrapped up filming. Are you going out with a bang? 

I have a couple of days, and then I take off for the Mythbusters live tour. It will in all likelihood be my last time in the public eye. Something will likely pop up here and there, but for the last 14 years, I’ve been only a few days or weeks away from a camera crew. It’s odd—I’m someone who is not very gregarious, doesn’t crave attention, doesn’t talk much and am not that good at it. And yet for the longest single period in my life of doing one thing, that’s exactly what’s been required of me. That’s why I’m often told I seem cranky on-camera. But it also seems to be a prominent part of the on-screen chemistry between me and Adam [Savage].

The full Q&A at Indianapolis Monthly.

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Five Nights in the Life of the Drive-By Truckers (via Live Nation TV)

Patterson Hood (Erika Goldring/Getty Images)

Patterson Hood (Erika Goldring/Getty Images)

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Live Nation TV — The banner men of southern rock Drive-By Truckers just released a marquee live album this fall. The deluxe version of It’s Great To Be Alive runs three-plus-hours, and comes packaged as a 3-CD behemoth (or 5-LP, if you prefer your behemothing more analog) that includes 35 songs drawn band over the last two decades. And even though the band has played over 2,000 shows since they formed in 1996, co-founder Patterson Hood feels that now’s the perfect time to document it.

“We’re glad people seem to be excited. You never know when it could be, ‘Ugh, these guys again,'” laughs Hood, calling from his new home base in Portland, where he and his family moved this year.

It’s Great To Be Alive, recorded last fall over three nights at the Fillmore in San Francisco, was designed to approximate the loose, rambling feel of one of those 2,000 shows. (A one-disc best-of version titled This Weekend’s the Night! is coming, too.) The band never actually operates with a setlist, so they cull from all corners of their sprawling catalog, from a pre-Truckers track called “Runaway Train” to material from last year’s sterling English Oceans.

“We wanted it to be like an ultimate playlist, from our point of view and the fans’,” Hood said. “I had so much fun getting all geeky about that shit.” Here’s what they came up with.

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Taking a Stand: How Chris Leeuw is Offering Neurohope to the Paralyzed (via Indianapolis Monthly)

Chris Leeuw (Photo / Stephen Simonetto via Monthly)

Chris Leeuw (Photo / Stephen Simonetto via Monthly)

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Indianapolis Monthly — He wasn’t being a daredevil. His choice wasn’t some expression of defiant, idealistic independence or gratuitous death-cheating. Chris Leeuw was on a kayak trip with friends near Edinburgh in August 2010 when he decided to jump off an abandoned truss bridge—a high bridge, sure, 50 or so feet, but he knew the water was deep. He was 28. People do that sort of thing when they’re 28.

The problem was the guy next to him, who climbed up to make the leap as well. Leeuw didn’t know the guy, though he didn’t mind the company. They jumped at the same time, but Leeuw—at 6´2˝and 200 pounds—fell faster. The other guy drifted over toward Leeuw while falling; witnesses later said it looked as though Leeuw opened up a hole in the water for him. The damage from their collision was instant. Leeuw heard nothing, felt nothing. It’s not like you sense a crack or hear a snap when your spinal cord is hurt. He was fortunate to have air in his lungs at the time, so his motionless body rose to the surface by itself. But the ascent happened slowly, too slowly, and he reached that point when you’re underwater for too long and you can’t hold your breath anymore and your lungs need to draw in. Luckily, the guy who landed on top of Leeuw reached him and dragged him out of the river to a little beach, where Leeuw’s brain caught up with his instincts and started to churn. He thought of all those NO DIVING signs with the lightning bolts through the words from his days as a lifeguard. What did I just do to myself?

Read the full story at Indianapolis Monthly.

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‘I Was an Everything Addict’: The Bizarre Transformation of Andrew Zimmern (via Success)

thebizarretransformationofandrewzimmern

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Success — On the afternoon of Jan. 28, 1992, Andrew Zimmern walked into a coffee shop on Manhattan’s Lower West Side. He could have come from anywhere—from the building he’d been squatting in for most of the past year, from any of the subway stations where he lurked to lift purses and tourists’ jewelry, from any of the urban caves he went to dry out or come down.

What the then-30-year-old stepped into was a roomful of friends—“20 of my nearest and dearest,” he says now—who ushered him in, told him again how much they loved him, put a one-way ticket in his hand and sent him 1,200 miles west to Minnesota.

“It was not my first attempt at getting sober,” he says. “I was a terrible alcoholic. I was a heroin addict. I was an everything addict. And for a long time, my addiction dominated my life and devastated the people around me whom I loved the most.”

The full story over at Success.

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10 Things We Learned from Talking to Penny Hardaway about Lil Penny (via GQ)

Lil-Penny-02

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GQ — We’re not prone to making blanket statements about puppets, but let’s get saucy: Every single one of the Lil Penny commercials kills. Every. Single. One. To research this story, we watched, like, thirteen of Penny Hardaway’s vintage Nike ads in a row—“The Secret Service couldn’t guard me,” the “Frozen Moment” parody, “That was Tyra Banks, fool!,” “Ken Griffey Jr. for president,” “I guess Spike Lee wasn’t available,” the most baller Super Bowl party guest listof all time—and they’re all genius. (And that list doesn’t even count LP’s intro of the “NBA on NBC” coverage of the ’96 Magic vs. Bulls Eastern Conference Finals, in which he takes a table saw to a pair of Jordans “just to see what was inside.”)

Lil Penny was bizarro Hardaway—a wingman/coach/publicist/true player whose ego was everything Penny’s wasn’t. For much of the decade, Hardaway was one of the best in the game, a four-time All-Star, NBA Finalist, Olympic gold medalist, and guy touted as a league savior while that other guy was off taking batting practice and making Space Jam. And to this day, Penny says, he gets people coming up on the street and making puppet jokes.

Big Penny reflects on Lil Penny here.

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Howard Wasdin: The SEAL Down the Street (South Magazine)

Dr. Howard Wasdin / South Magazine

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South Magazine — You know how it is: You’re a New York Times best-selling author, out for the weekend piloting your plane over Florida coast, when out of nowhere, right on your tail, bam, there’s John Grisham. “I’ve got a 235 Charger, basically a really nice single-engine plane,” says Dr. Howard Wasdin, 51, Georgia chiropractor, former member of SEAL Team Six, Purple Heart-awarded veteran of the Black Hawk Down battle of Mogadishu, author and guy who’s probably underselling his plane right now.

“And [Grisham] comes flying in behind me in a Citation, this really nice jet. His house is down the beach from my condo — I always show people his place, saying I’ve got to sell a whole bunch more books to get that. And his Citation overtakes me flying into Fernandina — I had to hold out over the ocean and come in behind him,” he says, laughing at the idea of two best-selling authors landing on a little spit of land in northern Florida at the same time. “It’s all good.” Actually, make that three.

“The funny thing is, between where I am and Grisham’s place, Stephen King is building his new house.” Three big-shot authors, within a half-mile of each other, in one sleepy, humid corner of the world. “Now keep in mind,” Wasdin says, “King is king, and Grisham has 22 New York Times best-sellers. I’ve had one.” Luckily, it’s a pretty good one.

Read more in the December/January issue of South Magazine.

 

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Jaimie Alexander, Goddess Of War (South Magazine)

south jaimie alexander

The South Magazine — If you come across actress Jaimie Alexander on the movie or TV screen, chances are good she’s winning in a fight.

The Greenville, South Carolina, native appears as the warrior-goddess Sif in the first Thor movie and sequel, Thor: The Dark World, due in November. (That would be her in the trailer battling stone-monsters alongside Chris Hemsworth and holding a sword to the throat of Tom Hiddleston’s evil, awesome demigod, Loki.) This past January she starred with former politician Arnold Schwarzenegger in the throwback action film, The Last Stand.  She appeared for two seasons on the cult ABC sci-fi series Kyle XY with cool superhuman powers.

For the first Thor movie she even got an extreme close-up teaser poster of her face, overlaid with the text “THE GODDESS OF WAR.” And sometimes she gets involved in sword accidents. “I love doing the stunts, but they can be dangerous, like when I accidentally hit someone in the face with a sword,” she says. “Luckily he had a lot of padding, so it didn’t hurt that badly.” We’ll pause here to let you think about the last time you came home from work after hitting someone in the face with a sword, just not that badly.

Read more in the new issue of South magazine.

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